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  • Michelle Farnill

Is a Crowd Needed for the Ultimate Sporting Performance?



AHHHHH the Olympics!!


What a great time to be alive if you love sport. Even more so when it is occurring in a time zone very close to your own.


But I feel for Japan. Spending millions and not getting the return of people coming to enjoy their country and the event they have meticulously planned.


I feel for the Japanese athletes, training with the inspiration to compete in front of a roaring crowd supporting them.


I feel for the athletes at their first, or potentially their last, Olympics and not being able to intimately share those moments with family and friends.


Some will place emphasis on their coach being there, the person who has shared the sweat at training, and revel in their coaches’ reactions (say hello Titmus’ coach) and will be happy to share the success with others when they get home.


But some athletes might prefer to have no crowds. For some it would allow them even greater concentration and focus on what they are doing.


For some athletes this situation in Japan will be able to give them even better performances than if there were crowds, than if their family were present. No distractions, no bias of the crowd, just get on with the job at hand.


A quiet atmosphere can allow people to turn inwards, to focus on every stroke, every pass, every shot, every single breath take to fuel their body to compete.


I bet you weren’t expecting that because most people imagine going to these tournaments and having a giant crowd cheering. It is the norm, it is what is expected, but that still doesn’t mean it will work for everyone.


All of this comes down to understanding how you are thinking and feeling. How you are processing the stimuli around you and inside of you when you are competing.


For me I love knowing my loved ones are there supporting me, even if I make a mistake or the players or coaches aren’t happy, my loved ones will always be by my side. Personally, that gives me strength and I know this about myself and have known this for a long time.


I also felt over the years I would perform better when I knew I had people in the crowd cheering me on.


However this can also work against me. When there is no one to support me, for example when I go to nationals on the other side of the country and they can’t follow.


Or even when I was umpiring in my own state and they couldn’t get to the competition every day because of work.


I have now set up ways that I can perform even if the situation happening around me isn’t ideal for me.


This comes with knowledge of yourself and what you like, don’t like, and what impacts you, or alternatively doesn’t impact you. Plus from this knowledge you can then learn skills to limit the things that negatively impact you and really enhance the things you can control that work for you.


This is only learnt from either hard hard life lessons, taking tournament after tournament to working shit out by yourself. Self analysis which can be hard if you are stuck in your own head and don’t have an answer, or don’t even know the right question to ask to help you deal with a situation.


Or you can work with a performance coach to understand what is needed for your ultimate performance. A person that takes what you are struggling with, confused about, stressed about, and gives you actionable steps to progress with your development rather than stay bogged down in the anxiety, nerves and overwhelm.


Really the choice is yours. I spent those hard years working it out for me. It isn’t always a fun time and it can be lonely trying to work it all out. Once I started talking to mentor about what was happening in my head, what I was focusing on that wasn’t working for me, I was able to find ways to move forward.


So if you are interested in having someone in your corner, helping with your mental performance, supporting you through working all this stuff out, then contact me. I have an exciting offer that is JUST FOR YOU!!

Email me asking about how you can get your ultimate performance in sport!

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